There’s a reason that client testimonials for Rebecca W. Geyer & Associates make many of the same points in describing their experience:   “They made us feel so comfortable….”  “took time to explain..”  “easy to understand…”  “straightforward…”  “stress-free…”  “made an unpleasant necessity not so painful…”  “caring…”

The attorneys of Geyer & Associates, PC understand the challenges, fears, and family dynamics that often come into play with legal issues having to do with estate planning and elder law. We adopt an empathetic and compassionate approach to assist clients in addressing their particular goals and concerns because, frankly, to us, that goes with the territory.
In a recent article in the Indianapolis Star, Debra Auerbach talked about words that help or hurt a resume. It’s actually a turn off to employers when candidates use “fluffy” words that make it unclear what you actually accomplished, she says. Some of those useless self-descriptions include “go-getter, “team player”, “results-driven”, and “bottom line”. She quotes one director of human capital who put it this way:  Give me “I did” phrases, not “I am” phrases.  How did you bring value to your former employer?

OK, so just how do we put our compassion to work in bringing practical value to Geyer & Associates’ clients and their families?

  • Compassion means being timely and responsive.  That means responding to all client communications the day they are received.
  • Compassion means being accessible. While our office is easily reached for most, we offer house calls for those who find it difficult to come to us.
  •  Compassion means being flexible in scheduling appointment times that meet clients’ needs.
  • Compassion means doing twice as much listening as talking. We remind ourselves every day that your planning is about you and about accomplishing your goals in ways that are in keeping with your values and wishes.

We were amazed to learn that there’s a whole new body of literature focusing on teaching empathy and compassion in medical schools. At the same time, the American Bar Association writes about the dangers of  “compassion fatigue”, a form of secondary traumatic stress that affects those in the helping professions, including the legal profession.

We’ll willingly take that “compassion fatigue” risk.  After all, estate planning and compassion – (remember the old song “Love and marriage”? Well, you can’t have one without the other!